#Fincabulary 30 – Moneyness

Meaning – A description of a derivative relating its strike price to the price of its underlying asset. Moneyness describes the intrinsic value of an option in its current state.

Moneyness tells option holders whether exercising will lead to a profit. There are many forms of moneyness, including in, out or at the money. Moneyness looks at the value of an option if you were to exercise it right away. A loss would signify the option is out of the money, while a gain would mean it’s in the money. At the money means that you will break even upon exercising the option.


#Fincabulary 29 – Guerrilla Trading

Meaning –  A very short-term trading technique that aims to generate small profits while taking on very little risk per trade and repeating this multiple times in a trading session. Guerrilla trades typically have a shorter duration than scalping or day trades and seldom last for more than a few minutes, at the most. Because of its high trading volume and limited return nature, low commissions and tight trading spreads are prerequisites for successful guerrilla trading.

While guerrilla trading can be applied to any financial market, it is particularly well suited for trading foreign exchange. This is because the major currency pairs typically have very tight trading spreads because of their plentiful liquidity that is virtually available around the clock.

But these elevated levels of leverage – which may be as much as 50 times the trader’s capital – represent a high-risk, high-reward scenario that can wipe out an inexperienced guerrilla trader in a few trading sessions.


#Fincabulary 14 – Bagel Land

Meaning – A slang term that represents a stock or other security that is approaching zero in price.

This term is typically used to describe an asset that has fallen from grace as opposed to a penny stock or other historically cheap security. If a stock or other asset is headed towards bagel land or is approaching zero, investors generally feel that the security is nearly worthless. In such cases, a company may be nearing bankruptcy or facing major solvency issues. While returning from bagel land is possible, the likelihood that equity investors will lose their entire stakes in the company becomes very high.


#Fincabulary 7- Contango



Feasibility Of Export Led Growth In Time Of Global Slow-Down

By- Apoorv Srivastav

The engine of the global economy has started to stagnate. One of the biggest arguments that favors this statement is that the export led growth is no more feasible. The export led growth pioneered by Germany and Japan in 50’s and 60’s was further adopted by the Four Asian Tigers: Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan, before finally getting implemented by China in early 90’s. The export-led growth rose to eminence in the late 70s, replacing the import-substitution model and was a prominent global economic factor for the following four decades.

The fall of export led growth

Currently, US economy is debt saturated and still struggling to recover from the crash of 2008, and Europe is also constrained by fiscal austerity and Brexit. Export has lost its feasibility as buyers themselves are struggling. And the impact of which can be seen from Bank of Japan adopting negative interest rates & European Central Bank (ECB) implementing Quantitative Easing (QE) to increase the domestic consumption by reducing its lending rate 10 basis points to -0.4%.

Secondly, Emerging Market (EM) economies have become a larger share of the global economy, increasing from 39.1 percent in 1980 to 57 percent in 2014 and their collective export is not letting the industrialized economies recover, leading to the economic tension between EM and Industrialized nations.

For EM country, export led growth would have been a safe bet, but the recessionary condition of the US and Euro market is making hard to find buyers. This proves export led model is critically dependent on the global economy, and any global crisis will affect the economy directly.

The competition has increased with many EM countries following the same model. One of such methods is ‘Currency devaluation’ which countries like China and Japan are using to boost their exports and seeking trade advantage over other countries.

Though export led growth proved to be a sound strategy for Asian countries, but it was not the case everywhere. Mexico, whose GDP growth was 6.4% during 1950-80, reducing to 2.6% for 1980-2008 and finally 1.1% in 2013 because of export led growth model.

To conclude, we can say that the export led economy has lost its feasibility for EM and is posing a risk to the global economy. Countries need to recalibrate and shift from the export led growth to the demand led growth, with a greater role of domestic and regional demand.




Love gone bad! No I am not referring to any Bollywood couple’s breakup but Britain’s exit from the European Union (EU). On 23rd June 2016, the people of Britain voted for the most important decision of their life which will impact not only them but also the future generations of Great Britain and EU. BREXIT will surely transform the economic, political and social landscape of EU.

ECONOMIC – Official trade statistics show that EU is the destination for half of British exports. But Britain’s share of intra-EU exports and imports is only 10.1% and 6.0% respectively. This number is also inflated because goods exported by Britain out of Europe are transited through Rotterdam port in The Netherlands. This phenomenon is termed as ROTTERDAM EFFECT.

Britain’s Total Export to EU 402.3 Billion Euro Britain’s share in total intra – EU exports Britain’s share in total intra – EU imports
Britain’s Total Import to EU 344.2 Billion Euro 10.1% 6.0%

Foreign investments in EU might dry up as companies use Britain as gateway to Europe because of Zero–tariff environment and free movement of labour and capital. Britain with 28% has the highest foreign investment in EU.

EU will have to find a replacement for London which has long served as the financial nerve centre of EU. Many investment banks having headquarters in London will have to move out of London so as to serve the European market. Germany which imports 14% of financial services will be the biggest loser in EU because of increase in cost of financial services.

POLITICAL – For starters, EU would lose an influential member which would have helped them to crack trade deals and have a say in World politics and economics. There will certainly be a shift in the power of decision-making in EU. Germany and France will want the decision-making power to shift towards them which might create further political frictions.

SOCIAL – Another pressing issue is immigration. The free movement of labour might be restricted in Britain due to BREXIT. This will result in the surge of low-wage migrant labourers from Africa and Middle East to EU. This might add fuel to the existing anti-immigration movements in EU and may lead to further political differences amongst EU members.

SECURITY – With the growing threat of ISIS, security is a key issue for EU. Britain is home to world-class intelligence agencies like MI5 and MI6. BREXIT will put EU at the back foot in counter terrorism and intelligence operations. The plans for building a unified European army will also be hit.

The EU after BREXIT will be an impaired regional and a geopolitical union as compared to the current EU, which already punches far below its economic weight in regards with  the global and regional diplomatic and strategic matters.